Sessions> Pandemics and Privacy: Reducing the Stigma of Drone use to Support the Public

Pandemics and Privacy: Reducing the Stigma of Drone use to Support the Public

Earlier this year, the Westport, Connecticut police department announced its plan to use drone technology to monitor social distancing and detect fevers, all in an effort to prevent the spread of the coronavirus. Days later, these plans were canceled, in large part because of a scathing condemnation from the American Civil Liberties Union of Connecticut which accused “privacy-invading companies [of] using COVID-19 as a chance to market their products and create future business opportunities.” Arguments that drones threaten ever-dwindling individual and collective privacy are not new. And as this event illustrates, such arguments can suppress drone innovation and use – some times to the detriment of public health and safety. Privacy rights vis-à-vis so-called government intrusion have evolved significantly over time and all too often in the wake of technological developments. Analysis of this historic progression is instructive and offers lessons for the drone industry. The crossroads of technology development and the COVID019 pandemic is indeed an opportunity for the industry – not just to generate business, but to showcase how responsible utilization can improve public health and safety and individual lives without endangering privacy rights and civil liberties. This session will review 4th Amendment jurisprudence and offer recommendations as to how the industry can use today’s unique circumstances to build community trust and enthusiasm for multitudes of drone applications.

Track

Drone Nexus

12/16

4:45pm – 5:30pm

Speakers

Pandemics and Privacy: Reducing the Stigma of Drone use to Support the Public

Earlier this year, the Westport, Connecticut police department announced its plan to use drone technology to monitor social distancing and detect fevers, all in an effort to prevent the spread of the coronavirus. Days later, these plans were canceled, in large part because of a scathing condemnation from the American Civil Liberties Union of Connecticut which accused “privacy-invading companies [of] using COVID-19 as a chance to market their products and create future business opportunities.” Arguments that drones threaten ever-dwindling individual and collective privacy are not new. And as this event illustrates, such arguments can suppress drone innovation and use – some times to the detriment of public health and safety. Privacy rights vis-à-vis so-called government intrusion have evolved significantly over time and all too often in the wake of technological developments. Analysis of this historic progression is instructive and offers lessons for the drone industry. The crossroads of technology development and the COVID019 pandemic is indeed an opportunity for the industry – not just to generate business, but to showcase how responsible utilization can improve public health and safety and individual lives without endangering privacy rights and civil liberties. This session will review 4th Amendment jurisprudence and offer recommendations as to how the industry can use today’s unique circumstances to build community trust and enthusiasm for multitudes of drone applications.

Speakers

Track

Drone Nexus

Date

12/16

Time

Sessions> Pandemics and Privacy: Reducing the Stigma of Drone use to Support the Public

Pandemics and Privacy: Reducing the Stigma of Drone use to Support the Public

Earlier this year, the Westport, Connecticut police department announced its plan to use drone technology to monitor social distancing and detect fevers, all in an effort to prevent the spread of the coronavirus. Days later, these plans were canceled, in large part because of a scathing condemnation from the American Civil Liberties Union of Connecticut which accused “privacy-invading companies [of] using COVID-19 as a chance to market their products and create future business opportunities.” Arguments that drones threaten ever-dwindling individual and collective privacy are not new. And as this event illustrates, such arguments can suppress drone innovation and use – some times to the detriment of public health and safety. Privacy rights vis-à-vis so-called government intrusion have evolved significantly over time and all too often in the wake of technological developments. Analysis of this historic progression is instructive and offers lessons for the drone industry. The crossroads of technology development and the COVID019 pandemic is indeed an opportunity for the industry – not just to generate business, but to showcase how responsible utilization can improve public health and safety and individual lives without endangering privacy rights and civil liberties. This session will review 4th Amendment jurisprudence and offer recommendations as to how the industry can use today’s unique circumstances to build community trust and enthusiasm for multitudes of drone applications.

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